Mac OS X box (2001)

This Mac OS X box is the original retail box for the Mac OS X v10.0 operating system. Somewhat ironically, it shipped with a Mac OS 9 CD.

The box lists the Mac OS X Core technologies as:

  • Aqua
  • Darwin
  • Quartz
  • OpenGL 3D
  • QuickTime 5
  • Classic
  • Carbon and Cocoa
  • Java 2 Standard Edition
  • Apple Type Services
  • AppleScript
  • ColorSync
  • Unicode
  • BSD networking

The inside flap of the box offers a less technical version of Mac OS X’s features: “The super-modern operating system that delivers the power of UNIX with the legendary simplicity and elegance of the Macintosh.”

The four key technologies discussed include:

  • Unprecedented Stability and Performance
  • Designed for the Internet Age
  • Killer Graphics
  • Easy Transition

Source: Wikipedia

Mac OS 9 9.0.4 box (2000)

Mac OS 9 was Apple’s final version of its “Classic” operating system. This iteration, version 9.0.4, was released April 4, 2000, and its changes included “Improved USB and FireWire support and other bug fixes.”

This specific boxed version is a 10-client license and features iTools, Apple’s first suite of online services that would eventually become iCloud.

The box also mentions that Mac OS 9 introduces “more than 50 new features” and includes “nine Internet power tools.” The tools include:

  1. Sherlock 2
  2. Multiple Users
  3. Voiceprint Password
  4. Keychain
  5. Auto Updating
  6. Encryption
  7. File Sharing over the Internet
  8. AppleScript over TCP/IP
  9. Network Browser

Source: Wikipedia

Apple CD media (2002)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs from 2002 include:

  • Mac OS X v10.2 Install Disc 2 (Version 10.2, 2Z691-3705-A, 2002)
  • Getting Started with Mac OS X version 10.2 Self-Paced & Practice Files (691-4118-A, 2002)
  • AppleWorks 6 Education Version [Mac OS 8.1 or later (built for Mac OS X) and Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP, Version 6.2.4, 691-3659-A, 2002]
  • Software Bundle (603-2348-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • iBook Mac OS 9 Install (Mac OS version 9.2.2, CD version 2.1, 691-3996-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-2787-A, iBook Media, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Install Disc 1 (Mac OS version 10.3.3, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4926-A, 2002)
  • eMac OS X Software Restore 9 of 9 (Mac OS X applications, Classic support, CD version 1.0, 2Z691-4933-A, 2002)
  • Software Bundle (603-5097, eMac Media, 2002)

Apple shipped CD bundles in cardboard envelope packages in 2002. Since each computer required a different number of CDs, various envelope sizes were used to accommodate the number of CDs. A white envelope with a light gray Apple logo is used in this example.

iPod classic (Generation 7, 120 GB, silver, 2008)

This Late 2018 iPod classic was very similar to the previous Generation 6 model. This iPod was available in 120 GB or 160 GB capacities, had a 2.5-inch color LCD display (320×240, 163 ppi), and was available with a black or silver anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back. This model is the third generation of the iPod classic.

The software included a Cover Flow option for selecting albums with three games bundled, including iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

Macintosh Classic (1990)

The Macintosh Classic was a less expensive interpretation of the Macintosh Plus with an updated case design that still retained the classic Macintosh look. It featured an 8 MHz 68000 processor, 1 MB of 2 MB of RAM, and either a 1.44 MB disk drive or a 1.44 MB disk drive, and a 40 MB hard drive. the screen was a 9-inch monochrome CRT display.

The Macintosh Classic was the first Mac to sell for under $1,000 (at $999).

Source: EveryMac.com


iPod classic Generation 6 (80 GB, black, 2007)

The iPod classic Generation 6 continued the “classic” iPod design and used a 4200 RPM ATA-66 hard drive long after all other iPod models had switched to flash memory. The advantage to the spinning hard drive was that it could hold far more songs for a lower price.

The iPod classic Generation 6 offered a 80 GB or 160 GB hard rive capable of supporting 20,000 or 40,000 songs and 100 or 200 hours of video.

The iPod classic models use a 2.5-inch color LCD display with an LED backlight at 320×240 and use cases with either a silver or black anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back (previous models used white or black polycarbonate fronts). The iPod classic models were the first full-size iPod models to not be offered in white.

The larger case also allowed for long battery life: 30 hours of music and 5 hours of video for the 80 GB model and 40 hours of music and 7 hours of video for the 160 GB model.

The software included a CoverFlow option for selecting albums, and three games were bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com