iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 17-inch (2006)

The iMac Core 2 Duo 2.0 was the second iMac design to use a flat-panel display. It featured a 2.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor (T7200) (with two independent processor cores on a single chip), 1 GB of RAM (667 MHz DDR2 SDRAM, PC2-5300), a 160 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading DVD+R DL SuperDrive, a built-in iSight video camera, and built-in stereo speakers. The flat panel display was a 17-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1440×900 pixels.

Ports on this iMac included three USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire 400 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and mini-DVI supporting an external display in extended desktop mode (rather than only supporting mirrored mode). This iMac also included built-in AirPort Extreme support.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 17-inch (2003)

The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch was among the first aluminum PowerBook laptops. The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447 (G4) processor, 512 MB of RAM, an 80 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive, a slot-loading 2X SuperDrive, a FireWire 800 port, built-in Bluetooth 1.1 and AirPort Extreme (802.11g), and an ambient light sensor keyboard. The 17-inch widescreen TFT display had 1440×900 resolution, a very large display for a laptop then and now.

The previous version of the PowerBook G4 17-inch laptop had a slightly slower processor (1.0 GHz), a smaller hard drive, and a lower resolution graphics card. This PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch upgraded the USB ports to the USB 2.0 standard.

This and all 17-inch PowerBook laptops at the time were near-perfect portable solutions for graphic artists and filmmakers. The high performance of these laptops allowed them to run the most recent versions of Adobe Photoshop and Apple Final Cut Pro, allowing creatives to flexibility to work anywhere with the same power available on desktop computers at the time with a very large display.

The internal photos were added in November 2020 when I made a slight repair to the internal hinges to allow the magnetic clasps to keep the lid closed. This example has a structural problem that was likely sustained due to a drop, but it still functions.

Source: EveryMac.com