MacBook (white, 2009)

Apple originally released the MacBook in 2006 as a followup to the iBook line of laptops. The MacBook was the first laptop to use the MagSafe connector, a power connector that attached to the laptop with a magnet that easily broke free to prevent the power cord from pulling the laptop off a table or a lap.

I own both a black and white version of the first-generation MacBook. White MacBook laptops have two finishes: the outer case is glossy and prone to light scratches; the inside is a flatter and has a less reflective white finish.

Source: EveryMac.

MacBook (black, 2008)

Apple originally released the MacBook in 2006 as a follow-up to various iBook laptop iterations. The MacBook was the first laptop to use the MagSafe connector, a power connector that attached to the laptop with a magnet that easily broke free to prevent the power cord from pulling the laptop off a table or a lap.

The first-generation MacBook was made of polycarbonate and was available in glossy white or matte black.

I own both a black and white version of the first-generation MacBook. To purchase it new, the black model was just over $100 more than the white version for no other reason than it came in black. At the time, all other Mac models were white or silver.

Source: EveryMac

PowerCD (1993)

Long before the iPod, Apple released the PowerCD, a CD player that could also play audio, read data CDs, and display Kodak photo CDs. The device could connect to both computers and TVs. The PowerCD was also portable since it could be powered by batteries, but a set of powered speakers were necessary for it to be used as a portable music player.

The PowerCD was Apple’s first stand-alone product for consumers that did not require a computer to operate; however, it was designed and manufactured by Philips (the unit is a Philips CDF-100). Apple’s version was produced in the dark gray color used at the time for PowerBooks and included Apple fonts with the classic rainbow logo.

I acquired my PowerCD on eBay and was thrilled that it came in excellent condition. Since this device is not well known, I did my best to show all its angles, disassembled components, and the included remote control.

Source: Wikipedia.

eMac (2003)

The eMac was released in 2002 as the final CRT-based all-in-one Mac. It was manufactured for a relatively long time—just over 4 years—and was discontinued in 2006. Although the design is similar to the CRT iMac, it lacks a handle and was extremely difficult to move with a weight of 50 pounds. In addition, the screen size is larger than the original iMac and the eMac features a G4 processor, making it significantly faster.

The eMac was intended to be an education-only Mac, but its popularity, power, and lower price made it attractive to the consumer market. When the eMac was released, the second-generation iMac had just been introduced with a flat-panel display on an adjustable chrome arm. At the time, LCD screens were considerably more expensive than CRT screens so an eMac could be purchased for $999, while second-generation iMac cost $1,299.

The eMac in my collection was manufactured in 2003. Almost 10 years after I acquired my eMac, I was able to get an Apple eMac Tilt and Swivel Stand (M8784G/A). The stand is attached to the bottom of the eMac to both raise it to a more comfortable viewing height and allow it to easily tilt.

Information adapted from EveryMac.com.

Macintosh TV (1993)

I acquired my Macintosh TV in the early 2000s in an eBay purchase. This 1993 Macintosh is said to be among the most rare with sources reporting between 8,000 and 10,000 manufactured. The machine is based upon the Macintosh LC 520, but it came standard with a TV and FM tuner card with a remote control. The computer was Apple’s first computer to ship standard with a cable-ready (BNC port) television built in.

One of the rare elements about this computer is that it was all black, including the ADB mouse and keyboard, both the standard issue at the time of manufacture. At the time, all other Macintosh computers were beige.

The CD player uses a tray cartridge design. To insert a CD, you remove the tray, open the clear plastic tray lid, insert the CD, and then insert the tray cartridge into the CD slot. The CD slot is labeled “CD Caddy.”

When I did the photo shoot for my Macintosh TV, I noticed that rust had formed around the serial and printer ports in the back of the computer. I removed the back and slid out the motherboard to found that the internal battery had ruptured and corroded many of the surrounding parts. I cleaned the inside of the board and removed the battery. I also didn’t attempt to start the computer since several components on the board were affected.

Source: EveryMac.com.

Apple Collection

I began collecting Apple computers in the late 1990s when I couldn’t part with my PowerBook 1400c after I upgraded to a PowerBook G3. Since I appreciate Apple design, I also collected posters, advertisements, and various logo items over the years. When iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch devices were released, it seemed logical to collect those items as well. More than twenty years later, I have an extensive collection of all things Apple.

I have always done my best to artfully display my collection in my home over the years without making my house look like a warehouse. I’m to the point where most would agree that my theme is mostly Apple, but I still make the attempt to make the display tasteful. Many of my friends refer to my house as an Apple Museum. I don’t (and can’t) disagree.

Beginning in late 2018, I decided to start an official catalog of my collection. My goal is simple: document at least one item per week and post it on my Apple Collection blog here on mattjfuller.com. I’m using a Nikon D3500 (with 18–35mm lens) and an inexpensive lighting setup. Each blog entry is planned to include some basic information, occasional personal commentary, and photos of the item(s). I’m new to this kind of photography so please bear with me as I learn the process.