PowerBook G3 Series 233 (“Wallstreet,” 1998)

The  PowerBook G3 was a member of the “PowerBook G3 Series” family, but more commonly referred to by its “Wallstreet” codename. It featured a 233 MHz PowerPC 740 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, a 2.0 GB hard drive, and a 20X tray-loading CD-ROM drive. Three different screen sizes were available: 12.1-inch STN (passive matrix), 13.3-inch TFT, or 14.1-inch TFT color display.

The Wallstreet PowerBook G3 Series included dual hot-swappable bays that could both hold batteries or expansion modules in a 3.5-inch left bay and a 5.25-inch right bay. It also included dual PC card slots and the 13.3-inch and 14.1-inch models had S-video out.

This Wallstreet PowerBook is one of two examples in my collection. This model has a VST Zip drive in the right bay and a battery in the left bay.

Original pricing for the Wallstreet PowerBook G3 Series was $2,999 to $3,500 with other custom configurations available.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G3 Series 233 (“Wallstreet,” 1998)

The  PowerBook G3 was a member of the “PowerBook G3 Series” family, but more commonly referred to by its “Wallstreet” codename. It featured a 233 MHz PowerPC 740 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, a 2.0 GB hard drive, and a 20X tray-loading CD-ROM drive. Three different screen sizes were available: 12.1-inch STN (passive matrix), 13.3-inch TFT, or 14.1-inch TFT color display.

The Wallstreet PowerBook G3 Series included dual hot-swappable bays that could hold batteries or expansion modules in a 3.5-inch left bay and a 5.25-inch right bay. It also included dual PC card slots and the 13.3-inch and 14.1-inch models had S-video out.

This Wallstreet PowerBook is one of two examples in my collection. This model has the same drive bays that typically shipped: a CD-ROM drive in one bay and a battery in the other bay.

Original pricing for the Wallstreet PowerBook G3 Series was $2,999 to $3,500 with other custom configurations available.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G3 400 (MHz) (“Lombard,” 1999)

The PowerBook G3/400 had a distinctive translucent bronze-colored keyboard and was often referred to by its codename, “Lombard.” The codename was a reference to its curvy case design reminiscent of the curvy Lombard Street in San Francisco. 

The bronze-keyboard PowerBook featured a 400 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 64 MB of RAM, and a 6.0 GB hard drive, and a tray-loading 2X DVD-ROM drive. The screen was a 14.1-inch TFT active-matrix color display.

The PowerBook G3 bronze keyboard systems were approximately 20% thinner than earlier PowerBook G3 models, had a longer battery life, weighed substantially less, and added dual-display support. This was also the first “professional” PowerBook to drop the ADB and Mac serial ports for dual USB ports. However, the laptop retained the old SCSI port. 

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G3 500 (MHz) (“Pismo,” 2000)

The PowerBook G3 500 was a member of the PowerBook FireWire family and referred to by its codename, “Pismo.” It featured a 500 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 128 MB of RAM, a 12.0 GB or 20.0 GB hard drive, and a tray-loading 6X DVD-ROM drive. The screen was a 14.1-inch TFT active-matrix color display.

Although the PowerBook G3 shares a case that is similar to the “Lombard” PowerBook G3 models that came before them (with a bronze keyboard), the “Pismo” PowerBooks used a faster logic board, a faster hard drive, and faster graphics. Pismo PowerBooks also supported optional AirPort (802.11b), and included dual FireWire ports.

This laptop cost $3,499 when it was released.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G3 Series (233 MHz) (“PDQ,” 1998)

The PowerBook G3 Series was Apple’s second PowerBook G3 line. The different PowerBook G3 Series models used internal codenames and this laptop was referred to as “PDQ” (Pretty Darn Quick).

The PowerBook G3/233 (“PDQ,” Late 1998) featured a 233 MHz PowerPC 750 (G3) processor, 32 MB of RAM, 4 MB of SGRAM for video, a 2.0 GB hard drive, and a 20X tray-loading CD-ROM drive. The screen was a 14.1-inch TFT active-matrix color display.

The case was a two-tone black design with both a hard plastic and a rubberized finish. The case was the same as the “Wallstreet” PowerBook that preceded it and included dual hot-swappable bays which could both hold batteries or expansion modules (the left used a a 3.5-inch bay and the right used a 5.25-inch bay). 

While the “PDQ” PowerBook G3 Series had a fast processor and performed well for the time, the “PDQ” moniker described the simplification of its production process by offering one screen size instead of three and, therefore, solved supply issues “Pretty Darn Quick.”

Source: EveryMac.com


PowerBook 1400c/117 (1996)

The PowerBook 1400c/117 featured a 117 MHz PowerPC 603e processor, 16 MB of RAM, and a 750 MB or 1.0 GB hard drive. The color active-matrix display measured 11.3 inches. The PowerBook 1400c/117 display supported 16-bit color for the built-in display, but could also support up to 8-bit color on an external monitor with an optional video card.

The PowerBook 1400 series was the first PowerBook to use an internal CD-ROM drive and stackable memory modules. This PowerBook also offered a clear cover on the outer case and shipped with preprinted “BookCovers” to customize the look of each PowerBook.

I used a PowerBook 1400c for several years and regularly designed and printed my own BookCovers. At the time, I used this laptop for several music arranging and composition applications. Using the Passport Encore music notation software, I plugged my PowerBook 1400c into a MIDI interface and it controlled my ProteusFX sound module.

Source: EveryMac.com


PowerBook 520 (1994)

The PowerBook 520 featured a 25 MHz 68LC040 processor, 4 MB or 12 MB of RAM, and a 160 MB or 240 MB hard drive. The screen was a 9.5-inch grayscale passive-matrix display. 

The PowerBook 500 series laptops introduced the “trackpad” to the Macintosh: the cursor followed the movement of your finger on a pad rather than spinning a plastic trackball with your finger. The trackpad has proven to be a revolutionary input device and has been used since in most notebooks. The PowerBook 500 series also introduced the idea of dual-swappable bays that could be used to hold either one battery and a PCMCIA adapter or two batteries.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook 520c (1994)

The Macintosh PowerBook 520c featured a 25 MHz 68LC040 processor, 4 MB or 12 MB of RAM, and a 160 MB, 240 MB, or 320 MB hard drive. The screen was a 9.5-inch color dual-scan display.

The PowerBook 500 series laptops introduced the “trackpad” to the Macintosh: the cursor followed the movement of your finger on a pad rather than spinning a plastic trackball with your finger. The trackpad has proven to be a revolutionary input device and has been used since in most notebooks. The PowerBook 500 series also introduced the idea of dual-swappable bays that could be used to hold either one battery and a PCMCIA adapter or two batteries.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook 540 (1994)

The PowerBook 500 series laptops introduced the “trackpad” to the Macintosh: the cursor followed the movement of your finger on a pad rather than spinning a plastic trackball with your finger. The trackpad has proven to be a revolutionary input device and has been used since in most notebooks. The PowerBook 500 series also introduced the idea of dual-swappable bays that could be used to hold either one battery and a PCMCIA adapter or two batteries.

The Macintosh PowerBook 540 featured a 33 MHz 68LC040 processor, 8 MB or 12 MB of RAM, and a 240 MB hard drive. The screen was a 9.5-inch grayscale active-matrix display.

The PowerBook 540 was similar to the PowerBook 520 that was being offered at the same time, but the PowerBook 540 had a faster processor and a higher quality active-matrix display.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 12-inch (2004)

The PowerBook G4 12-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447a (G4) processor, 256 MB of DDR SDRAM, a 60 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (4200 RPM), a slot-loading 8X Combo drive or a 4X SuperDrive, and Bluetooth 1.1/AirPort Extreme (802.11g). The case was made of an aluminum alloy. The 12.1-inch TFT XGA display was 1024×768 pixels. The small size offered considerable computing power in a highly mobile package.

The PowerBook G4 1.33 was similar to its predecessor (PowerBook G4/1.0 12-inch), but had a new logic board design and faster performance.

Source: EveryMac.com