iPhone 7 Plus (128 GB, jet black, 2016)

This particular iPhone 7 Plus model was used with an AT&T network in the United States. All iPhone 7 Plus models used a 5.5-inch widescreen multitouch Retina HD display at 1920×1080 (401 ppi). It used a taptic-engine that provided a clickless Home button. The iPhone 7 Plus used three cameras: two rear 12-megapixel cameras (one with a wide-angle and one with a 2x telephoto lens) and a front FaceTime HD camera (7 megapixels and 1080p).

The iPhone 7 Plus was originally available in five color options: silver (white glass front and a silver back), gold (white glass front and a gold back), rose gold (white glass front and a pink-tinted gold back), black (black glass front and a matte black back), and jet black (black glass front and a high-gloss anodized and polished black aluminum back). On March 21, 2017, Apple added a (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition with a white glass front and a red aluminum back.

The iPhone 7 Plus was splash, water, and dust-resistant (but not waterproof). It had a Lightning port, but lacked a headphone jack.

Internally, the iPhone 7 Plus used a 64-bit Apple A10 Fusion processor with four cores; 3 GB of RAM; and 32, 128, or 256 GB of storage. It supported 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.2, LTE (4G), and NFC for Apple Pay.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPad (Generation 3, cellular, 32 GB, white, 2012) with iPad Smart Case (green)

The iPad Generation 3 was significantly more powerful than the two previous iPad models and introduced the “Retina” display, a 9.7-inch multitouch screen at 2048×1536 (264 ppi). Internally it used a dual-core 1 GHz Apple A5X processor with quad core graphics; 1 GB of RAM; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p); a front-mounted FaceTime camera; 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 4.0.

This specific iPad model supported 4G LTE connectivity on Verizon’s network in the US.

According to Cult of Mac, the iPad Generation 3 had the “shortest lifespan of any iPad in history. Apple debuted the fourth-gen model just 221 days after the iPad 3 went on sale. The iPad 4 added the Lightning connector, making the iPad 3 the last iPad to support the old 30-pin dock connector.”

The Smart Case for was made of polyurethane and fit several iPad models including iPad 2 (2nd generation), iPad (3rd generation), and iPad with retina display. The Smart Case offered full protection and the cover was magnetic so when the case was open the iPad woke up and automatically went to sleep when closed.

The interior of the case was made of a soft, color-matched microfiber lining that helped keep the display clean. By folding the cover into a triangle, Apple advertised the case positions as a “FaceTime and movie stand” while upright and a keyboard stand to “tilt iPad into a comfortable typing position” when flat.

Sources: EveryMac.com, Cult of Mac

iPad (Generation 3, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, black, 2012, unopened)

The iPad Generation 3 was significantly more powerful than the two previous iPad models and introduced the “Retina” display, a 9.7-inch multitouch screen at 2048×1536 (264 ppi). Internally it used a dual-core 1 GHz Apple A5X processor with quad core graphics; 1 GB of RAM; 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage; a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p); a front-mounted FaceTime camera; 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 4.0.

In my experience as a school Technology Director, the iPad Generation 3 began a shift in thinking that the iPad was not just a content-consumption device, but also a content-creation device. The iPad Generation 3 built upon the iWork apps introduced with he original iPad and camera introduced with the iPad Generation 2 by adding a considerably faster processor and better screen. Soon after the release of the iPad Generation 3, many schools began implementing multiple iPad devices eventually leading to 1:1 initiatives where each student is issued an iPad for learning.

According to Cult of Mac, the iPad Generation 3 had the “shortest lifespan of any iPad in history. Apple debuted the fourth-gen model just 221 days after the iPad 3 went on sale. The iPad 4 added the Lightning connector, making the iPad 3 the last iPad to support the old 30-pin dock connector.”

Source: EveryMac.com, Cult of Mac

iPhone 6 (64 GB, space gray, 2014)

This particular iPhone 6 model was used an AT&T network (and functioned throughout North America). All iPhone 6 models had a 4.7-inch multi-touch screen at 1334×750 (326 ppi, Retina HD display). It had two cameras: a rear 8 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera (720p).

The iPhone 6 was originally available in three color options: silver (white glass front and a silver aluminum back), gold (white glass front and a gold aluminum back), and space gray (black glass front and a medium-gray aluminum back). The iPhone used a unibody design with rounded sides (similar to the iPod touch Generation 5). The glass screen curved slightly at the edges. It also included a Touch ID fingerprint sensor.

The iPhone 6 used a 1.4 GHz 64-bit Apple A8 processor with 1 GB of RAM and 16, 32, 64, or 128 GB of storage. In addition to 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0/4.2, and LTE (4G), it included NFC for Apple Pay transactions. It had both a bottom-mounted headphone jack and a Lightning port.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 5 (slate gray, 2012)

The iPhone 5 included a 4-inch widescreen multi-touch Retina display at 1136×640 (326 ppi); a rear 8-megapixel, 1080p iSight camera, a front 1.2-megapixel, 720p FaceTime HD camera; and 4G/LTE support. The aluminum unibody case had a glass front and came in either a dark gray slate matte back with a glossy black front or a silver matte back with a glossy white front.

The iPhone 5 uses a 1.3 GHz dual core Apple A6 processor, has 1 GB of RAM, and 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of flash storage. It also included three noise canceling microphones, a bottom-mounted headphone jack, and a new USB 2.0 Lightning port for connectivity.

Source: EveryMac.com