Apple TV HD (2021) and Siri Remote (Generation 2, 2021)

The Apple TV HD (A1625) was previously known as the Apple TV Generation 4. It was originally released in 2015 when it came with the Siri Remote (Generation 1). In 2021 Apple renamed this device the “Apple TV HD” upon release of the Apple TV 4K (Generation 2). Both the Apple TV HD and Apple TV 4K (Generation 2) shipped with a then-new Siri Remote (Generation 2).

The Apple TV HD had ports including HDMI (1.4), 10/100BASE-T Ethernet, and a USB-C port (“for service and support”). Wireless connectivity included Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g/n/ac), Bluetooth 4.0, and an IR receiver. This Apple TV supported 720p or 1080p, but lacked support for 4K.

The Apple TV HD included the Siri Remote (Generation 2). This remote was all silver and included a “touch-enabled clickpad” to “click titles, swipe through playlists, and use a circular gesture on the outer ring.” Like its predecessor, it charged with a Lightning cable, included an IR transmitter, and used an internal microphone for Siri commands. It was larger than the original Siri Remote at 5.4 x 1.4 inches with a weight if 2.2 ounces. This new remote lacks both the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors that were included in the original Siri Remote.

The Apple TV HD used a dual core Apple A8 processor and came with either 32 or 64GB of internal flash memory storage. This example is a 32GB model.

Sources: EveryMac, Apple (Siri Remote, Apple TV)

Remote Loop (2015)

The Remote Loop is an accessory for the Siri Remote, Apple’s remote for the Apple TV 4K and Apple TV HD. When the Apple TV HD (Generation 4) was released with support for games, the Siri Remote included motion sensors for use in some games.

As the Nintendo Wii demonstrated, TV screen safety became an issue when the controller’s motion sensors require swinging a remote at the TV. Apple created the Remote Loop to keep you TV screen safe. According to Apple:

“The Remote Loop keeps your Siri Remote safely tethered to your wrist so you won’t have to worry about accidental slips or drops. It clicks into the Lightning connector on the remote for secure attachment and easy removal. And you can adjust the size for a snug and secure fit. The Remote Loop is compatible with the Siri Remote for Apple TV 4K and Apple TV HD.”

The Remote Loop sold separately and was similar to the iPod touch Loop. However, the Remote Loop uses a connector similar to a Lightning port, but with retracting spikes on both sides. The spikes serve to securely attach the loop to the remote and are released by squeezing the buttons on both sides. A similar connection method was used in early 30-pin Apple connectors that shipped with iPod and early iPhone devices.

The Remote Loop measures 8.68 inches long, 0.36 inch wide, and 0.22 inch deep. It weighs 0.1 ounce. The Remote Loop was only available in black.

Sources: Apple (Siri Remote, Remote Loop), 9to5mac

iPhone 7 (128 GB, silver, 2016)

The iPhone 7 has a 4.7-inch screen at 1334×750, also known by Apple as a Retina HD display. The iPhone has a front and back camera: the rear camera is 12-megapixel and the front camera is a 7-megapixel FaceTime HD camera with 1080p video. 

The iPhone 7 was the first iPhone (along with the iPhone 7 Plus) to remove the 3.5 mm headphone jack and only include a Lightning port for audio. Like the iPhone 6 and 6s before it, the iPhone 7 uses a “clickless” Home button that clicks using an internal Taptic-engine-powered solid state component. Although the iPhone 7 is not water-proof, it is splash, water, and dust-resistant. 

The iPhone 7 came in several colors: silver (white glass front, silver back); gold (white glass front, gold back); rose gold (white glass front, pink-tinted gold back); black (black glass front, matte black back); jet black (black glass front, a high-gloss black anodized and polished black aluminum back); and later added a (PRODUCT)RED Special Edition (white glass front, red aluminum back). 

The iPhone 7 uses the Apple A10 Fusion  processor, 2 GB of RAM, and was available with 32 GB, 128 GB, or 256 GB of flash storage.

While I opted for the iPhone 7 Plus as my personal phone in the iPhone 7 era, I chose the then-new (and not offered since) jet black color. I immediately covered the glossy finish with a case to heed Apple’s warning that jet black “may show fine micro-abrasions with use.” (It did scratch easily!)

Source: EveryMac

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, silver, unopened, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I kept my original iPad mini in my daily backpack for a very long time due to its near perfect size and weight as a truly mobile device with the same 1024×768 screen as a standard iPad of the time (just with smaller pixels). I purchased this additional iPad mini as an example for my collection and never unboxed it. This version has a silver back and white front. 

Source: EveryMac 

iPad mini (original, Wi-Fi, 16 GB, space gray, 2012)

The original iPad mini featured a 7.9-inch screen at 1024×768 (163 ppi). Internally, it had a dual core 1 GHz Apple A5 processor; 512 MB of RAM; and 16, 32, or 64 GB of storage. It had two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p). The original iPad mini used a Lightning port.

I found the iPad mini perfect for travel due to its small size, reduced weight, high-quality display, and 10-hour battery.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 7 Plus (128 GB, jet black, 2016)

This particular iPhone 7 Plus model was used with an AT&T network in the United States. All iPhone 7 Plus models used a 5.5-inch widescreen multitouch Retina HD display at 1920×1080 (401 ppi). It used a taptic-engine that provided a clickless Home button. The iPhone 7 Plus used three cameras: two rear 12-megapixel cameras (one with a wide-angle and one with a 2x telephoto lens) and a front FaceTime HD camera (7 megapixels and 1080p).

The iPhone 7 Plus was originally available in five color options: silver (white glass front and a silver back), gold (white glass front and a gold back), rose gold (white glass front and a pink-tinted gold back), black (black glass front and a matte black back), and jet black (black glass front and a high-gloss anodized and polished black aluminum back). On March 21, 2017, Apple added a (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition with a white glass front and a red aluminum back.

The iPhone 7 Plus was splash, water, and dust-resistant (but not waterproof). It had a Lightning port, but lacked a headphone jack.

Internally, the iPhone 7 Plus used a 64-bit Apple A10 Fusion processor with four cores; 3 GB of RAM; and 32, 128, or 256 GB of storage. It supported 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.2, LTE (4G), and NFC for Apple Pay.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPad mini (Generation 2, 16 GB, black, 2013, unopened)

The iPad mini 2 was originally referred to as “iPad mini with Retina Display.” It featured a 7.9-inch 2048×1536 (326 ppi) display; a dual core 1.3 GHz Apple A7 processor; 1 GB of RAM; and 16, 32, 64, or 128 GB of storage. The iPad mini 2 was available in white (with a silver back) or black (with a medium gray gunmetal back).

The iPad mini 2 included two cameras: a rear-mounted 5 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front-mounted 1.2 megapixel FaceTime HD camera (720p), dual-band 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, two microphones, and two speakers. This iPad used a Lightning port and included a headphone jack.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 6 (64 GB, space gray, 2014)

This particular iPhone 6 model was used an AT&T network (and functioned throughout North America). All iPhone 6 models had a 4.7-inch multi-touch screen at 1334×750 (326 ppi, Retina HD display). It had two cameras: a rear 8 megapixel iSight camera (1080p) and a front 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera (720p).

The iPhone 6 was originally available in three color options: silver (white glass front and a silver aluminum back), gold (white glass front and a gold aluminum back), and space gray (black glass front and a medium-gray aluminum back). The iPhone used a unibody design with rounded sides (similar to the iPod touch Generation 5). The glass screen curved slightly at the edges. It also included a Touch ID fingerprint sensor.

The iPhone 6 used a 1.4 GHz 64-bit Apple A8 processor with 1 GB of RAM and 16, 32, 64, or 128 GB of storage. In addition to 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0/4.2, and LTE (4G), it included NFC for Apple Pay transactions. It had both a bottom-mounted headphone jack and a Lightning port.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 4 (2010)

The iPhone 4 represented a major design leap from the previous models with an all stainless steel body, a 3.5-inch Retina display at 960×640 (326 ppi), a chemically hardened “aluminosilcate” over the front display, and the chemically hardened black glass back. A white option was announced, but did not ship for over a year after the announcement.

The iPhone 4 was the first iPhone with dual front and back cameras: a 5 megapixel HD video/still camera (720p at 30 FPS), a 5X digital zoom, and an LED flash on the rear; and a VGA-quality video/still camera on the front designed for video conferencing over Wi-Fi using FaceTime. Both cameras used noise-cancelling microphones.

The iPhone 4 was powered by an A4 processor and added additional mobile network support. It included a digital compass, GPS, an accelerometer, and a new 3-axis gyroscope.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPhone 5 (slate gray, 2012)

The iPhone 5 included a 4-inch widescreen multi-touch Retina display at 1136×640 (326 ppi); a rear 8-megapixel, 1080p iSight camera, a front 1.2-megapixel, 720p FaceTime HD camera; and 4G/LTE support. The aluminum unibody case had a glass front and came in either a dark gray slate matte back with a glossy black front or a silver matte back with a glossy white front.

The iPhone 5 uses a 1.3 GHz dual core Apple A6 processor, has 1 GB of RAM, and 16 GB, 32 GB, or 64 GB of flash storage. It also included three noise canceling microphones, a bottom-mounted headphone jack, and a new USB 2.0 Lightning port for connectivity.

Source: EveryMac.com