Apple CD and DVD media (1997)

My collection of Apple CD and DVD media includes operating systems, applications, software collections that shipped with devices, promotional media, diagnostic tools, and educational content. In general, Apple-branded CD or DVD examples in original packaging have been presented separately, while single discs or collections of discs are presented chronologically.

Apple CDs and DVDs from 1997 include:

  • eMate 300 Connectivity CD, Newtown (Version 1.1, 691-1630-A, 1997)
  • Disney/Pixar A Bug’s Life DVD (video, original packaging, 1997)
  • ClarisWorks 4.0 for Windows (1991–1997)
  • Power Pack CD Power of 10 (templates for Ad Pad materials, 1997)
  • Mac OS 8 (Version 8.0, 691-1773-A, U97073-049B, 1997)
  • Mac OS 7.6.1 (Version 7.6.1 V1.0.2, Z691-2046-A, 1997)
  • Drive Setup 1.3.1 (691-1796-A, U97073-131A, 1997)
  • Apple QuickTake 200 Software For Mac OS (Version 1.0, 691-1338-A, 1997)
  • The Apple Printer Software Collection for the Color StyleWriter 4500 (Version 1.0, 691-1415-A, 1997)
  • The Apple Printer Software Collection for the Apple LaserWriter Series (original packaging, Version 1.1, 691-1522-B, 1997)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Power Macintosh G3 (SSW Version 8.0, CD Version 2-1.0, 691-1826-A, 1997)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Power Macintosh 5400, 5500, and 6500 series (SSW Version 7.6.1, CD Version 1.0, 691-1559-A, 1997)
  • Apple Macintosh CD, Power Macintosh 9600 and 8600 series (SSW Version 7.6.1, CD Version 1.0, 691-1623-A, 1997)
  • AppleVision Software (Version 1.2, 691-1462-A, 1997)
  • AppleVision Software (Version 1.3, 691-1665-A, 1997)
  • AppleShare IP 5.0 CD (bundle, 1997)
  • AppleShare IP 5.0 (Version 5.0.2, Z97073-108A, 1997)
  • AppleShare IP 5.0 Companion CD (Version 5.0, Z96073-104A, 1997)
  • AppleShare IP 5.0 CD (bundle, 1997)
  • Mac OS 7.6 (Version 7.6, Z97073-038A, 1997)
  • AppleShare IP 5.0 (Version 5.0.1, Z96073-103B, 1997)
  • Apple Network Administrator Toolkit 2.0 (U96073-026B, 1997)

In 1997 Macintosh computer system software was able to fit on a single CD. For Macintosh computers, Apple used a standard white CD envelope with a white cloth-like back and a clear plastic front. Since Macintosh servers required several CDs, Apple used a clear plastic CD book with space for a thin, square book at the front and pages with white backs and clear plastic covers. Each page held a single CD. The design of Apple CDs began to change in 1997 from the older black and silver design (with red accents) to a design with a single background color, black or white text, and with some CDs using few additional accent colors.

eMate 300 (1997)

The eMate 300 was designed specifically for the education market and was used extensively in the schools where I was a Director of Technology in the late 1990s to early 2000s. 

At the time, students primarily used desktop computers in a computer lab setting, while laptops were used by some school administrators and few teachers. We used the lower-cost eMate 300 for students who had difficulty handwriting, and most students and teachers preferred typing on this device over an AlphaSmart keyboard device that was also available at the time.

The eMate 300 ran the NewtonOS, a different operating system than the Macintosh computers of the time. The eMate 300 featured a 25 MHz ARM 710a processor, 8 MB of ROM, 3 MB of RAM (1MB of DRAM+2 MB of Flash Memory for user storage), a PCMCIA slot, IrDA-beaming capabilities, and a proprietary Newton InterConnect port.

The design was quite unique with a translucent aquamarine and black “clamshell” portable case with a 480×320 16-shade grayscale backlit LCD display. The eMate 300 included a stylus and a built-in keyboard (and did not support a mouse).

The eMate was the only Newton model to resemble a traditional laptop rather than a handheld device. Although the device was called the eMate “300,” no other models were manufactured.

eMate 300 design elements were clearly used in later Apple designs: the translucent plastic would show up a year later in the original Bondi blue iMac and later in the original iBook designs; the retro-futuristic curves and overall shape was also echoed in the iMac and iBook; and the NewtonOS is often considered a precursor to the iPhoneOS that would later become iOS.

My collection features several eMate 300 devices, many of them including original packaging.

Source: EveryMac.com