Apple blank DVD media (2001)

In the early 2000s when Apple began offering a re-writable CD/DVD drive as an option, they included your first blank DVD-R disc along with your Mac purchase. Apple took the opportunity to fully brand the disc with printed packaging and a custom-printed DVD-R.

I have two unused examples of this official Apple blank media, one with a grape (purple) logo “Certified for use with Power Mac G4 DVD-R drives” (part number 603-047-A, unopened in shrink wrap) and another with a blueberry (bright blue) logo “Certified for use with Apple DVD-R drives” (part number 600-8671).

iMac G5 2.0 20-inch (2005)

The iMac G5 featured a 2.0 GHz PowerPC 970 (G5) processor, 512 MB of 400 MHz PC3200 DDR SDRAM, a 250 GB (7200 RPM) Serial ATA hard drive, a vertically-mounted slot-loading 8X DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, and built-in stereo speakers at the bottom of the display. The screen was a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD at 1680×1050. Wired ports included FireWire 400 and USB 2.0. Wireless connections included AirPort Extreme (802.11g) and Bluetooth 2.0+EDR.

Like its predecessors, the iMac G5 rested on an aluminum stand with an adjustable hinge. It also supported the VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) mounting interface standard which allowed the iMac to be mounted directly on a kiosk, wall, or arm. The iMac G5 also had an Ambient Light Sensor under the edge of the display that dims the sleep indicator light when the room is dark.

Source: EveryMac.com

PowerBook G4 1.33 17-inch (2003)

The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch was among the first aluminum PowerBook laptops. The PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch featured a 1.33 GHz PowerPC 7447 (G4) processor, 512 MB of PC2700 DDR SDRAM, an 80 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (4200 RPM), a slot-loading 2X DVD-R/CD-RW SuperDrive, a FireWire 800 port, built-in Bluetooth 1.1 and AirPort Extreme (802.11g), and an ambient light sensor keyboard. The 17-inch widescreen TFT display was at 1440×900 resolution, a quite large display for a laptop.

The previous PowerBook G4/1.0 17-inch laptop had a slightly slower processor, a smaller hard drive, and a lower resolution graphics card. This PowerBook G4/1.33 17-inch upgraded the USB ports to the USB 2.0 standard.

This and all 17-inch PowerBook laptops at the time were near-perfect portable solutions for graphic artists and filmmakers. The high performance of these laptops allowed them to run the most recent versions of Adobe Photoshop and Apple Final Cut Pro, allowing creatives to flexibility to work anywhere with the same power available on desktop computers at the time with a very large display.

Source: EveryMac.com