iMac G4/1.25 20-inch (2003)

The iMac G4/1.25 20-inch Flat Panel featured a 1.25 GHz PowerPC 7445 (G4) processor, 256 MB of RAM (333 MHz PC2700 DDR SDRAM), an 80.0 GB Ultra ATA/100 hard drive (7200 RPM), a tray-loading 4X SuperDrive, support for AirPort Extreme (802.11g)/Bluetooth with optional cards, and a 20-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display at 1680×1050.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” It shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.3 Panther and cannot boot into “Classic Mode” (MacOS 9).

Source: EveryMac.com

iMac G4/700 15-inch (flat panel, 2002)

The iMac G4/700 (Flat Panel) featured a 700 MHz PowerPC 7441 (G4) processor, 128 MB or 256 MB of RAM (PC133 SDRAM), a 40.0 GB Ultra ATA/66 hard drive (5400 RPM), either a tray-loading CD-RW drive or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo Drive, and a 15-inch TFT Active Matrix LCD display.

The internal components of this iMac are contained in a 10.6-inch half-sphere. Protruding from the top of the half sphere was a chrome stainless steel neck supporting the display. This design is sometimes referred to as the “sunflower iMac.” In addition to the polished stainless steel, the case and display are “ice white.” This iMac also included a matching ice white Apple Pro Keyboard and Mouse. The more expensive Combo Drive configuration of this iMac shipped with two clear spherical external Apple Pro Speakers.

This iMac shipped with MacOS X 10.1 and MacOS 9.2 installed with MacOS X selected as the default OS. 

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod classic Generation 6 (80 GB, black, 2007)

The iPod classic Generation 6 continued the “classic” iPod design and used a 4200 RPM ATA-66 hard drive long after all other iPod models had switched to flash memory. The advantage to the spinning hard drive was that it could hold far more songs for a lower price.

The iPod classic Generation 6 offered a 80 GB or 160 GB hard rive capable of supporting 20,000 or 40,000 songs and 100 or 200 hours of video.

The iPod classic models use a 2.5-inch color LCD display with an LED backlight at 320×240 and use cases with either a silver or black anodized aluminum front and a chrome stainless steel back (previous models used white or black polycarbonate fronts). The iPod classic models were the first full-size iPod models to not be offered in white.

The larger case also allowed for long battery life: 30 hours of music and 5 hours of video for the 80 GB model and 40 hours of music and 7 hours of video for the 160 GB model.

The software included a CoverFlow option for selecting albums, and three games were bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com

iPod nano Generation 3 (8 GB, red, 2007)

The iPod nano Generation 3 used a design unique to the iPod family with “squat” proportions in a thin case. It was available in 4 GB or 8 GB versions, with the 4 GB model offered only in silver, and the 8 GB models offered in silver, light blue, light green, black, and (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition, and later pink option was added. All models had a chrome stainless steel back.

Compared to the iPod nano Generation 2, the Generation 3 added a larger 2-inch (diagonal) color LCD display at 320×240 resolution, support for video on the internal display, and video out via the dock.

The software is greatly improved with enhancements including a Cover Flow option for selecting albums. Three games were also bundled: iQuiz, Klondike, and Vortex.

Source: EveryMac.com