Macintosh Server G3/300 Minitower (1998)

The Macintosh Server G3/300 Minitower was released in 1998 as the final beige tower design by Apple. This G3 Server used a 300 MHz PowerPC 750 G3 processor, a single 4.0 GB SCSI hard drive (with space for a second drive), and a 24x CD-ROM drive.

This minitower also contained a “Whisper personality card” that added audio input and output ports. According to LowEndMac, Apple had planned various “personality cards,” but only audio (“Whisper”), audio/video (“Wings”), and audio/video/DVD playback (“Bordeaux”) were ever produced.

The case design of this minitower includes a removable side panel and two internal tabs that, when released, allow the entire tower to tilt 90 degrees on a hinge allowing easy access to all internal components. Interestingly, the side door panel latch and internal tabs are made from translucent blue-green plastic, a design aesthetic that would soon become the Mac design norm that same year when the original iMac was released.

Ports on this computer include SCSI; ADB (Apple Desktop Bus); Ethernet (10-100); Mac serial and printer ports; Apple Video (DB-15), line-out and microphone 3.5 mm jacks. Three card slots are available: the first is empty, but ready for a high-speed SCSI port; the second slot has a second high-speed ethernet port; and the third slot adds two USB ports.

The exact factory configuration of the server is shown as: 1MB Cache/128MB/2x4GB UW/CD/10-100 ENET. The model is M4405, and the serial number area specifies a production date of May 27, 1998, at 3:30 PM.

Sources: EveryMac, LowEndMac

AppleDesign Keyboard (1996)

The AppleDesign Keyboard replaced the Apple Extended Keyboard II in 1994 and its design was meant to complement the design of Macintosh computers of the time. This keyboard included one additional ADB port (instead of two) that was somewhat hidden on the bottom of the keyboard. The ADB connector cable was permanently attached to the keyboard, while previous keyboard models used two ADB ports and shipped with an ADB cable that could be removed.

This keyboard was also released in black to match a black Performa 5420 (available in Europe), and a black Power Macintosh 5500 (available in Asia).

As of 2020 Apple has released approximately 20 external keyboard designs. In general, Apple Macintosh keyboards are different from standard keyboards because they include a Command key (⌘) for shortcuts; an Option key (⌥) for entering diacritical marks and special characters; and a Help or fn (function) key. Earlier Apple keyboards also included a power key (◁), while newer keyboards include eject (⏏).

Source: Wikipedia

Apple Keyboard II (1991)

The Apple Keyboard II was first released in 1990 with the Macintosh Classic and LC. This keyboard included flip-down feet in the back to increase the angle of the keyboard for more comfortable typing. This keyboard used the ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) connector.

While this keyboard used the same color of Platinum gray as Macintosh computers at the time, it was also included with the Macintosh TV in all black (using the same model number).

As of 2020 Apple has released approximately 20 external keyboard designs. In general, Apple Macintosh keyboards are different from standard keyboards because they include a Command key (⌘) for shortcuts; an Option key (⌥) for entering diacritical marks and special characters; and a Help or fn (function) key. Earlier Apple keyboards also included a power key (◁), while newer keyboards include eject (⏏).

Source: Wikipedia

Apple Keyboard (M0116, 1987)

The Apple Keyboard was also referred to as the Apple Standard Keyboard and was offered in addition to the lighter and slimmer Apple Desktop Bus Keyboard. The name Apple Keyboard would later be applied to different Apple keyboard designs, but this was the first use of this name.

This Apple Keyboard used Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) connections. The keyboard offered two ADB connections allowing the user to connect an Apple Desktop Bus Mouse to the keyboard (or directly to the back of the computer). This keyboard was both sold separately and included as an option with the Macintosh II and SE in 1987.

This keyboard also included a power button, a feature that would remain on Apple keyboards until the early 2000s. (The original Apple USB keyboard included with the original iMac was the last Apple keyboard to include a dedicated power button.)

This particular keyboard is damaged in the right side, but its performance is not affected.

Source: Wikipedia

Apple Adjustable Keyboard (1993)

The Apple Adjustable Keyboard is Apple’s only ergonomic adjustable keyboard. This keyboard was released in 1993 and used the then-standard ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) port to connect to Macintosh computers. The QWERTY keyboard is split down the center between the 5/6, T/Y, G/H, and B/N keys, while a large space bar remains fixed in the center. The keyboard can be split up to 30 degrees, and palm rests are included to support the wrists while typing.

The keyboard shipped with a separate, ADB-connected numeric keypad, also with a palm rest. The keyboard and numeric keypad each have feet to raise the keyboard to a steeper angle.

The purpose of this ergonomic design was to resolve repetitive stress injuries that could lead to carpal tunnel syndrome. The primary problem with this keyboard is the vast amount of desk space that is required to use it.

The Keyboard packaging provides the following information:

The Apple Adjustable Keyboard has been ergonomically designed to make typing more comfortable. Its features include:

  • A split alphanumeric section that can be adjusted from a standard typewriter-style configuration to an open-angle configuration.
  • An adjustable keyboard slope and optional palm rests (included), which help your forearms and hands assume a neutral, more comfortable position.
  • A separate extended keypad (included in this package) with 15 function keys, 6 special keys, 4 cursor-control keys in a standard inverted-T layout, and an 18-key numeric keypad.

Please read the manual that comes with this keyboard to find out how to best use this product. Be sure to read the “Health Concerns Associated with Computer Use” section.
This keyboard is compatible with all Macintosh computers equipped with an Apple Desktop Bus connector and system software version 6.0.7 or later.

The keyboard uses two types of switches/buttons: ALPS SKFS switches for the keyboard keys (providing “clicky” tactile feedback) and recessed buttons for the function keys, volume, power, and other non-typing controls.

I have two of these keyboards in my collection. One includes the original box.

Source: Wikipedia

Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) Mouse II (M2706, 1993)

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II transformed the angular blocky designs to a curved teardrop shape. This basic shape is still used in mouse designs today by Apple and others. This mouse was included with Macintosh computers from 1993–1998 when the original iMac was introduced.

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse II matched the platinum gray color of Macintosh computers at the time. However, a black version of this mouse was included with the Macintosh TV and the Performa 5420 (sold only in Europe and Asia).

Four different variations of the Apple Desktop Bus II Mouse are in my collection. The three platinum gray color versions have different color trackballs, and one has no label (with the product numbers cast directly into the plastic). The fourth example is the black Apple Desktop Bus II Mouse included with the Macintosh TV.

Source: Wikipedia.com

Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) Mouse (A9M0331, 1986)

The Apple Desktop Bus Mouse was redesigned and named for its new ADB connector that was used in Macintosh computers from 1986–1998. This mouse featured low-profile blocky design with a flattened pentagonal side profile and a flat rectangular (slightly trapezoidal) bottom. It had a single button and tracked using a rubber ball.

I have three different variations of the ADB Mouse in my collection. One has a dark ring supporting the trackball, another has a light ring matching the color of the body of the mouse, and a third model uses a ring with an arrow.

The ADB port was a round, 4-pin plug that was used on the Apple IIGS (1986), Macintosh computers, and licensed for use on NeXT computers. The Apple Desktop Bus system was created by Steve Wozniak as a single connector for input devices that was inexpensive to produce. The Macintosh II and Macintosh SE were the first Macintosh computers to use the ADB port. 

Source: Wikipedia.com