Remote Loop (2015)

The Remote Loop is an accessory for the Siri Remote, Apple’s remote for the Apple TV 4K and Apple TV HD. When the Apple TV HD (Generation 4) was released with support for games, the Siri Remote included motion sensors for use in some games.

As the Nintendo Wii demonstrated, TV screen safety became an issue when the controller’s motion sensors require swinging a remote at the TV. Apple created the Remote Loop to keep you TV screen safe. According to Apple:

“The Remote Loop keeps your Siri Remote safely tethered to your wrist so you won’t have to worry about accidental slips or drops. It clicks into the Lightning connector on the remote for secure attachment and easy removal. And you can adjust the size for a snug and secure fit. The Remote Loop is compatible with the Siri Remote for Apple TV 4K and Apple TV HD.”

The Remote Loop sold separately and was similar to the iPod touch Loop. However, the Remote Loop uses a connector similar to a Lightning port, but with retracting spikes on both sides. The spikes serve to securely attach the loop to the remote and are released by squeezing the buttons on both sides. A similar connection method was used in early 30-pin Apple connectors that shipped with iPod and early iPhone devices.

The Remote Loop measures 8.68 inches long, 0.36 inch wide, and 0.22 inch deep. It weighs 0.1 ounce. The Remote Loop was only available in black.

Sources: Apple (Siri Remote, Remote Loop), 9to5mac

iPhone 6s (16 GB, silver, 2015)

The iPhone 6s had a 4.7-inch “3D Touch” screen at 1334×750 (326 ppi, Retina HD). The iPhone 6s cameras were vastly improved over the iPhone 6 that preceded it: a rear 12-megapixel 4K iSight camera and a front 5-megapixel FaceTime camera in 720p (the iPhone 6 used a, 8-megapixel back camera and 1.2-megapixel front camera).

The iPhone 6s was available in four colors: silver (white glass front, silver back); gold (white glass front, gold back); space gray (black glass front, medium-gray back); and rose gold (white glass front, pink-tinted gold back). 

The iPhone 6s did not use a physical Home button, but used its Taptic engine to simulate the click. It also used a Touch ID fingerprint sensor in the Home button. 

Inside, the iPhone 6s used the Apple A9 processor with 2 GB of RAM and was available in 16 GB, 32 GB, 64 GB, or 128 GB of flash storage. The iPhone 6s was the last iPhone to include a headphone jack (located on the bottom) and used  the Lightning port to connect to computer, dock, or power adapter.

This iPhone 6s example is an entry-level 16 GB model in silver with a white front. Unfortunately, this particular iPhone has a slight crack in the lower-left front screen glass (although it functions perfectly).

Source: EveryMac