Books

click Click to Agree:
Policies Impacting a One-to-One Mobile Learning Environment

The focus of this study is to evaluate current and recommend new school board policies to implement and maintain a one-to-one mobile learning initiative using iPads in a K–8 school district.
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Digital Commons at National Louis University (PDF)

 

slideSlide to Unlock:
Creating a Technology-Integrated Environment for Our Students

Over 150 students and three teachers participated in this study through surveys, discussions, co-planning, and teaching and learning activities. The result was a set of eight specific strategies for twenty-first century educators.
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Digital Commons at National Louis University (PDF)

 

tapTap the Screen:
Technology Integration in Our Students’ Lives

This ethnographic study focuses on the technology uses of students in Grades 3–8. Seventeen focus groups were conducted during this year-long study. Findings in eight categories inform technology integration in teaching and learning.
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Digital Commons at National Louis University (PDF)

 

Extended Descriptions

Click to Agree: Policies Impacting a One-to-One Mobile Learning Environment
The focus of this study is to evaluate current and recommend new school board policies to implement and maintain a one-to-one mobile learning initiative using iPads in a K–8 school district. The district’s current acceptable use policy is analyzed and it was determined that no modifications are necessary to govern the new one-to-one initiative. A new administrative procedure is proposed to address issues related to iPad use in and out of the district. A Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy is proposed for students and staff to supplement the electronic devices provided by the school district. The current acceptable use policy, the proposed mobile device administrative procedure, and the proposed BYOD policy are discussed from various perspectives. Advocated policy statements are proposed that discuss the goals, objectives, needs, values, and preferences of the various stakeholders affected by the one-to-one mobile learning initiative. The one-to-one initiative is presented in terms of educational, economic, social, political, and moral and ethical analyses. The policy argument offers practical considerations for implementing the proposed mobile device administrative procedure, and a “pro and con” argument regarding the proposed BYOD policy is provided. The policy implementation plan discusses the educational, communication, and professional development activities needed for implementation. The policy assessment plan presents progress monitoring processes to ensure that the policies and administrative procedure continue to meet the needs of students and staff during the course of the initiative. Finally, the summary impact statement theorizes possible effects of the proposed policies and administrative procedure.

Slide to Unlock: Creating a Technology-Integrated Environment for Our Students
The focus of this study is to explore how to support teachers in capitalizing on students’ technology skills, experiences, and preferences to offer enhanced teaching and learning experiences in school. Using a framework developed by Wagner et al. (2006), technology integration is systemically examined in terms of “4 Cs:” context, culture, conditions, and competencies to construct an “As-Is” picture of a school district based upon current realities. Next, a series of changes are proposed and the 4 Cs are used to describe the “To-Be” picture of the organization at the end of the proposed change journey. The three teachers who participated in this study used a protocol developed by the researcher with over 150 students that allowed the teachers to learn about their students’ technology skills, experiences, and preferences both in and outside of school. Information from the survey data was used by the researcher and participating teachers to co-plan technology-integrated projects that matched the students’ technology skills, experiences, and preferences. An analysis of the student projects and teacher interview data resulted in a set of eight strategies for educators, Creating a Technology-Integrated Environment for Our Students, presented in two themes. Theme one offers, Provide Technology- Integrated Student Learning Opportunities: (1) engage students by allowing choices; (2) share learning experiences (student-to-student; student-to-teacher); (3) create with digital tools, learn outside of school, and simplify learning experiences; and (4) practice student-centered assessment. Theme two offers, Provide a Technology-Integrated Environment: (5) seek student opinions and match tools with student interests; (6) build capacity in the classroom; (7) provide models for all teachers; and (8) allow students to take the lead.

Tap the Screen: Technology Integration in Our Students’ Lives
The focus of this study is to document and describe the integration of technology in the everyday lives of students in Grades 3–8 attending a high-performing public school district in an affluent Chicago suburb. The following research questions guide this study: How do students in Grades 3–8 integrate technology into their lives? What are the implications of students’ technology integration for teaching and learning? How can teachers capitalize upon students’ technology integration in ways that inform instructional practice? A review of the literature presents related information in areas that explore the increasingly digital world of our students; curriculum, instruction, and research; innovation, creativity, and learning environments; student social and cognitive development; and student technology use. In this ethnographic study, qualitative research methods are used to interview 55 students in 17 focus groups. An analysis of focus group data is presented in the following categories: technology device access and use; gaming; electronic book readers; television and online video; imposed limits on technology; communicating using technology; and technology in the school environment. Student technology use information is presented in the student voice and is then discussed in the context of improving teaching and learning. This study recommends that both parents and teachers should intentionally seek to understand the technology-enabled pursuits of children to better understand the “whole child.” Further, teachers and other school leaders are encouraged to welcome student-owned technology in school and encourage project- based learning opportunities.